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Conquering Our Caffeine Addiction: 8 Surprising Substitutes for Coffee

Conquering Our Caffeine Addiction: 8 Surprising Substitutes for Coffee

I still remember my first cup.

Unlike many of my friends who started drinking coffee in highschool, I managed to make it all the way to third-year university before giving in to the caffeine fiend. But when I had to stay up all night to finish a 20 page paper for class, there was only one thing that was going to get me through those long lonely hours in the library: coffee.

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Summer Iced Coffee using Keurig ® K-Cups ®

Summer Iced Coffee using Keurig ® K-Cups ®

Don't let the heat of summer keep you from the taste of your favorite coffee! If you haven't tried it before, try Iced Coffee now for a fresh cool taste and a great pick-me-up!For simple Iced Coffee, use your Keurig and your favorite coffee in a K-Cup and brew a fresh cup of coffee. But first, let the coffee cool a bit before you pour it over the ice. If you pour it too quickly, it waters the coffee down too much by melting the ice as it is poured. By letting it cool first, you get a better coffee flavor and don't have to stir as much!For a real cool-down, have your ice in a blender ready to go and add your coffee as you blend it into a smoothie! This drink is more like a mocha milkshake and is very refreshing.Finally, try adding some milk or ice cream and sweetener to make a real mocha milkshake out of your cup of coffee!Try it out and send us your favorite recipes! 

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5 Health Benefits of Coffee

5 Health Benefits of Coffee
ConsumerReports.org

The headlines about the health benefits of coffee seem to change as quickly as the time it takes to drink a cup. Is coffee good for you? Here's what the folks at Consumer Reports want you to know:

1. It may help you live longer.

True, coffee drinkers are more likely than nondrinkers to smoke, eat red meat, skimp on exercise, and have other life-shortening habits, according to a 2012 study in the New England Journal of Medicine. But when researchers took those factors into account, they found that people ages 50 to 71 who drank at least one cup of coffee per day lowered their risk of dying from diabetes, heart disease, or other health problems when followed for more than a decade. That may be due to beneficial compounds such as antioxidants—which might ward off disease—and not caffeine. Decaf drinkers had the same results.

2. It may perk you up.

Coffee is not just a pick-me-up; it also has been linked to a lower risk of depression. In a study led by the Harvard School of Public Health that tracked 50,000 women for 10 years, those who drank four or more cups of caffeinated coffee per day were 20 percent less likely to develop depression than nondrinkers. 
Another study found that adults who drank two to four cups of caffeinated cof­fee were about half as likely to attempt suicide as decaf drinkers or abstainers. The researchers speculated that long-term coffee drinking may boost the production of “feel good” hormones such as dopamine.

3. It contains many good-for-you chemicals.

For most Americans who drink coffee, it provides more antioxidants than any other food, according to Joe Vinson, Ph.D., a chemistry professor at the University of Scranton. But it’s also a top source of acrylamide, a chemical whose link to can­cer is being investigated.

4. It may cut your risk for type 2 diabetes.

A recent Harvard-led study of more than120,000 men and women found that those who increased the amount of caffeinated coffee they drank per day by more than one 8-ounce cup, on average, were 11 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those whose coffee habits stayed the same. And those who decreased their daily intake by at least a cup per day, on average, were 17 percent more likely to develop the disease.
But nix the doughnut with your morning cup; excess sugar might cancel out any benefit you might get from a balanced blood sugar level. And watch how much sugar and cream you add to your java—overdo it and you have a calorie- and fat-packed beverage.

5. Most people don't have to worry about the caffeine.

Data suggest that most healthy adults can safely consume, daily, up to 400 milligrams of caffeine—the amount in around two to four cups of brewed coffee. (Exact amounts vary a lot, though.) Pregnant women should keep it to less than 200 milligrams; kids, no more than 45 to 85 milligrams. More than that can cause side effects including insomnia, irritability, and restlessness. Caffeine stimulates the central nervous system, heart, and muscles.

Consumer Reports also recommends that if you have an anxiety disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, or heart disease, or if you take certain medications, watch your consumption or opt for decaf. And if you have acid reflux, you might want to skip coffee altogether because the acidity could exacerbate it.   www.ConsumerReports.org

 

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Coffeeology

Coffeeology

Espresso Yourself

Stay Grounded

Take Life One Cup At A time

Better Latte Than Never

Take Time To Smell The Coffee

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New Product: Adaptor for Keurig ® Vue ® Brewers

Reusable Adaptor to use K-Cup Packs in Keurig Vue Brewer

We know that many of you have been looking for a product from us for the Keurig ® Vue ® Brewers.  We are proud to announce this new product. It allows you to use K-Cup Packs, and ground coffee (with a stainless steel mesh or paper filter).

Check it out Now!

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